2 Peter 1:1-11 – A chain of support

In this, the first in a series of personaly Bible studies in the book of 2 Peter, we begin with a list of qualities that Peter encourages his readers to have, chained together one after the other. I figured it might be interesting to examine what the connection is between these qualities, and how they support each other.

“You must make every effort to support your faith with goodness, and goodness with knowledge, and knowledge with self-control, and self-control with endurance, and endurance with godliness, and godliness with mutual affection, and mutual affection with love.” 2 Peter 1:5-7

But before we get into that, a note about context. This is a letter, and follows the usual pattern for letters of that time. Peter introduces himself and states who he’s writing to, and then gives a bit of a general introduction to the letter before diving into the real meaty stuff. So this first passage probably isn’t what the rest of the letter is going to be about, but serves to encourage his readers to keep reading. That said, it seems very deliberate, so I don’t think we can just pass it off as introductory waffle – it deserves careful analysis. Peter won’t have linked together qualities like this without thinking about it first.

Faith supported by goodness

Faith is what differentiates believers from non-believers. Faith in Jesus is our personal acceptance of Jesus’s gift of forgiveness. It’s more than just accepting something is true, it’s trusting in it even though it’s more wonderful and more mysterious than we could ever understand. But, it would seem, faith on its own can be fragile.

I can remember being a teenager, and struggling a little with faith. All my life I had been taken to church, and I knew all the right answers, and believed in God, and had faith in Jesus’s promise of salvation. But it very rarely seemed to affect my daily life. I would go to school, do my work, have a laugh with my friends, come home, go to bed. Faith didn’t seem particularly relevant all the time. If I’m honest, that’s still true today, to a certain extent, only I’ve swapped school for work!

What Peter is telling us here is that our unquantifiable faith needs to show itself practically as well. It needs to be more than just a warm, comfy feeling on the inside. It needs to go beyond just an inward acceptance of Jesus. Goodness is something other people can see and experience, and it is by definition something active – goodness is ‘done’ to others. If we want our faith to have an impact on our daily life, it needs to be backed up by acts of goodness. It’s no good believing one thing and then doing another. Our faith needs to show itself through our actions, and actively being ‘good’ can strengthen the faith that prompted it.

Goodness supported by knowledge

What is ‘good’, anyway? In today’s age of post-modernity, anything goes, right? What’s right and true for me isn’t necessarily right and true for everyone. And given that Peter was talking about it nearly two thousand years ago, I’m betting this isn’t as new a problem as we might like to think. Goodness is contextual as well, which complicates matters further – what seems right today might be wrong tomorrow. Code that I wrote a few years ago may well have been perfectly accurate and fine at the time, but if I was writing it again today I’d probably do it differently. Words of advice that I gave last year might have been great at the time, but if I said the same thing today I’d get punched in the face. Being good it harder than it sounds.

The key, Peter tells us, is knowledge. Our acts of goodness can only be truly good if we know what we’re doing. And that means we need to make a conscious effort to understand the world around us, to keep ourselves informed, to listen to what people are saying. It’s only by understanding the need that we can work goodness into it.

Knowledge supported by self-control

I’m reminded of Solomon, here. Remember that time when two women came to him claiming a baby was theirs? Solomon’s knowledge of mothers, interpreted through the filter of wisdom, led him to a solution – cut the baby in half, and each woman could have half the baby. But it was self-control that stopped him from actually enacting that solution. He could have made the proclamation as king and had the baby chopped up, to make the point more clearly. But knowledge itself isn’t everything.

I think ego comes into this as well, to an extent. I love to learn new things, and I have to admit there are times when I’ll act as if I know the answer even if I don’t, because I like the feeling of knowing stuff. Sometimes I need to remind myself to keep some self-control, to know when sharing my ‘knowledge’ is useful, and when it might be better to keep quiet! Knowledge without self-control has the potential to be quite damaging.

Self-control supported by endurance

We’re in the middle of the list now, and it’s feeling a little more tenuous, as if Peter is trying desperately to steer his way through these qualities to end up at the right point! Nonetheless, there is something to learn from this connection. Self-control isn’t easy. As a musician, it’s wonderful to be able to hear myself, to hear the contribution that I’m making to the band/orchestra/group I’m playing with. It takes self-control to keep myself humble and not unbalance the whole sound. But it takes endurance to keep that going from start to finish. Endurance means that we can keep that self-control going until its completion. Lacking endurance means that whatever endeavour we were trying to have self-control about would be completely undone.

Endurance supported by godliness

Without this bit, the list of qualities could appear in any self-help book; it’s been about how we can live better lives, be more effective, avoid pitfalls. But what Peter tells us here is that endurance needs to be bolstered by godliness – being like Jesus.

The trouble with endurance is that it’s hard work. Ask any marathon runner and they’ll tell you that you have to push through the pain, drawing on reserves of strength and energy deep within you, to last until the end. But endurance isn’t just about sport. Endurance means staying patient with people even though they wind you up time after time. Endurance means sticking to your principles when you’re being told to do something that isn’t right. But perfect endurance demands more from us than we can give. And this is why being Christ-like is so important.

Jesus, part of the Trinity of Father, Son and Holy Spirit, never acted on his own. For all that he was the Saviour, he drew his strength from that relationship with the triune God. And it’s that strength that Jesus offers to us, too. The Holy Spirit fills us, guides us, reassures us, and helps us to endure what we wouldn’t otherwise be able to bear. It’s only by submitting to God in humility that we can endure all things.

Godliness supported by mutual affection

You can’t love God and hate your neighbour. That’s something Jesus taught us, and there’s good reason for that. The Pharisees loved God, but that love didn’t extend to the people they were meant to be leading, and that’s one of the reasons Jesus laid into them so often! We should love God, yes, but not at the expense of others. We shouldn’t be so wrapped up in our church commitments that we haven’t got time to have a coffee with a lonely friend. We shouldn’t be so concerned about blogging about a Bible study that we forget to spend the evening with our spouse (note to self: finish this quick and go downstairs…). Other people matter. They matter to God, so they should matter to us too. And if Jesus’s message to the Pharisees is anything to go by, our love for God cannot be complete unless we also love the people around us.

Mutual affection supported by love

Finally, Peter tells us that mere ‘affection’ isn’t enough. Love transforms an acquaintance into a friend. Love transforms idle chit-chat into a meaningful conversation. Love transforms sexual attraction into genuine relationship. Love transforms a little into a lot. We can have a lot of great qualities (see above), but if we don’t have love, it all falls apart. If we want to strengthen our faith, Peter tells us that what we need as our foundation is love.

Why?

At the beginning of this post I took an excerpt from the passage, specifically verses 5 to 7. But verse 5 actually starts “For this very reason”. It’s linked to the verses before, where it talks about how Jesus brought us into relationship with God, and has promised us eternal life. That’s what all this is about – eternal life. We know that faith is needed for us to be saved, but through this chain of supporting characteristics Peter reminds us that faith is only possible through love. And that’s quite wonderful, because perfect love is found in Jesus himself, bring us nicely back where we started!