Bible study: Acts 28 – The need for God

Some thoughts from my personal Bible study, mainly asking questions of the text and pondering some potential answers.

Why did the Maltese natives think Paul was a god?

This has to be one of my favourite bits of the Bible. Paul is shipwrecked off the coast of Malta, but survives. Then he gets bitten by a snake, so the natives assume he must be a murderer, and fate has not allowed him to survive after all. But Paul suffers no ill effects, so they assume instead that he must be a god. Now that’s what I call a change of direction!

It’s all too easy to jump to conclusions, isn’t it? Even in today’s age, where information is everywhere and the internet provides us with more data than we know what to do with, we still rely so heavily on gut instinct and presumption. We conclude before we have all the facts needed to properly form the conclusion. We judge people before we know them. We condemn people’s actions before we hear the full story. I’m reminded of the various celebrities and important people who have been accused of sexual assault in recent years, some of whom have turned out to be completely innocent. We see the headline, but we don’t read the full article to find out what actually happened. This passage in Acts is a good reminder to take time to form our opinions, and not to rush into a conclusion too soon.

But there’s something deeper, too. These Maltese natives had a concept of God. And in fact most places on earth do, whether they’ve been in contact with the rest of the world or not. No matter how advanced or primitive a society is, they will have a faith structure of some sort. It’s hard-wired into our very being, a God-space in each of us. Some of us try to fill that need with earthly things, but ultimately only God can fill a God-shaped hole.

What happened to all the other Apostles?

We’re at the end of Acts now. Last chapter. The end of the story of the Acts of the Apostles. But wait – what happened to the rest of them? It started off with the Eleven, who became the Twelve (again), and then Paul came on the scene as well, and then the Twelve were forgotten in the wake of all the other faithful believers doing great stuff, and then we ended up just following Paul. The book ends with Paul in house-arrest in Rome. Hardly an ending at all. Where is everyone else?

In fact, this is the last chronological account in the New Testament; the rest are letters (apart from Revelation, which is kind of in a category of its own). Thankfully, we can piece some of the rest of the story together from those letters, along with what we learn in other historical documents of the time, other letters and gospels that are not included in the official canon, and generally-accepted stories passed down by tradition (and that last one is understandably the most contentious of the lot). We know that all the Apostles died, in various ways, most of them killed for proclaiming the Gospel of Jesus. We know that the other believers scattered through the region all went on believing, and spreading the message of Jesus, and that his followers are still doing that today in every corner of the world. So, in some ways, there is technically no ‘right’ place to finish the book of the Acts of the Apostles, because that story is still being written today. Right now, I’m writing this blog article; that could arguably be in Acts too. It’s a story that includes all of us. No one is too obscure, or too unimportant, or too [insert adjective here] to appear in the story. And that’s what makes the book of Acts so fantastic – it’s OUR story. Yes, it had to have an end, picked somewhat arbitrarily perhaps, because otherwise it would be the longest book in history and impossible to print. But the story it tells includes you. It’s not just the Acts of the Apostles, but the Acts of the Believers around the world and throughout history. It’s the ongoing story of how the amazing message of grace is passed from person to person, embracing people with love and drawing them into relationship with God. And that’s a story worth being part of.

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